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Steep-Sloped Roofs (Residential)

Steep-Sloped Roofs tend to be used on residential applications. We utilize Asphalt Shingles, Clay and Concrete Tile, Metal, Slate and Synthetics.

Steep-slope roof systems typically are composed of individual pieces or components installed in shingle fashion. Steep-slope roof assemblies typically consist of three primary parts:

  • Roof deck — a roof deck is the structural substrate and usually is a wood-based material such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB).

  • Underlayment — underlayment provides temporary protection until a roof covering is installed and provides a secondary weatherproofing barrier. Sometimes underlayment is referred to as "felt" or "paper."

  • Roof covering — the roof covering is the external watershedding material.

Information Courtesy of the National Roofing Contractors Association


Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt shingles are composed of: a base material, either organic felt or glass-fiber mat, that provides support for the weather-resistant components and gives a shingle strength; asphalt and fillers; and surfacing material, generally in the form of mineral granules, that provides protection from impact and UV degradation and improves fire resistance.

Clay or Concrete Tile

Clay tile is produced by baking molded clay into tile. Tiles may be glazed and also may have surface texture treatments applied. As a result, there are a wide variety of tile profiles, styles, finishes and colors available. In addition, there may be separate accessory tiles—matched to each field tile design—of various shapes designed for use on ridges, hips, hip intersections and gable ends. Concrete tiles are made of portland cement, sand and water in varying proportions. The material is mixed and extruded on molds under high pressure. They generally have lugs on their undersides for anchoring to batten strips. There are additional waterlocks or interlocking ribs on the longitudinal edges that impede movement and prevent water infiltration.

Clay or Concrete Tile
Metal Panel Roof Systems

Metal Panel Roof Systems

There are three general categories of metal roof systems used for steep-slope roofing applications: architectural metal panel, structural metal panel and metal shingle/shingle panels. Generally, architectural metal panel roof systems are watershedding and are intended for use on steep slope roofs. Structural metal panel roof systems are used on low and steep slope roofs. Structural metal panel roof systems can be used on low slope roofs because of their hydrostatic, or water barrier, characteristics.

Slate

Roofing slate is a dense, durable, naturally occurring material that is essentially non-absorbent. Two properties of slate are cleavage and fracture. It has natural cleavage, which permits it to be easily split in one direction. Fracture, usually occurring at right angles to the cleavage, is called the grain. Roofing slate commonly is split so the length of the slate runs in the direction of the grain. The surface texture of slate after being split for commercial use derives from the characteristics of the rock from which it was quarried. Some slates split to a smooth, practically even surface, while others yield a surface that is rough and uneven.

Slate
Synthetics

Synthetics

There are some advantages to using synthetic roof coverings when compared to their traditional counterparts. Synthetic slate or "fake slate", for example, weighs substantially less than natural slate. The reduction in weight allows synthetic slate to be installed over conventional roof decks. Some synthetic products purport to be hail-mold and algae-resistant. Several synthetic cedar shake and cedar shingle manufacturers claim a labor savings, because fire-retardants or anti-algae coatings do not have to be applied to the product.




Courtesy of the National Roofing Contractors Association.

Affiliations

NRCA